Three kings and a queen from the New Kingdom to join the Pharaohs Royal Parade

Nevine El-Aref , Friday 26 Mar 2021

The remains of the four royals are among 22 mummies that will be transferred during the parade from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir to their final exhibition destination at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation in Fustat

ROYAL PARADE
King Amenhotep II - King Thutmose IV and Queen Tiye

The mummies of four royals - three kings and a queen - from the New Kingdom will take part in the Pharaohs' Royal Parade on 3 April.

The three ancient Egyptian kings are King Amenhotep II, King Thutmose IV, King Amenhotep III while the queen is Queen Tiye.

The remains of the four royals are among 22 mummies that will be transferred during the parade from their current place at the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir to their final exhibition destination at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation (NMEC) in Fustat

King Amenhotep II is the son of King Thutmose III of the 18th Dynasty of the New Kingdom. He ascended to the throne at about the age of 18 and ruled for at least 26 years.

The tallest in his bloodline, this king boasted about his athletic prowess, often representing himself performing feats of strength and skill.

Remembered as a great sportsman, he had the reputation of an excellent charioteer and also displayed considerable skill with the bow and arrow.

He maintained the borders of the empire solidified by his father and fought campaigns securing wealth and power for Egypt.

A prolific builder, he expanded the Karnak complex dedicated to the great God Amun.
 
Studies revealed that King Amenhotep II died around the age of 45.

His mummy was discovered in 1898 inside the quartzite sarcophagus in his own tomb (KV 35) in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor.

King Thutmose IV is the son of King Amenhotep II.

The “Dream Stela,” which was erected by him between the paws of the Sphinx at Giza, tells the story of how he became king.

As a young prince, he fell asleep in the shade of this colossal figure while hunting in the desert nearby. The Sphinx appeared to him in his dreams and instructed him to clear away the sand that covered its body. In return, he would be made the next pharaoh.

King Amenhotep III is the son of Thutmose IV.

After ascending to the throne as a teenager, he ruled for around 38 years.

King Amenhotep III was married to Queen Tiye, the daughter of a powerful provincial family from Akhmim.

His memorial temple at Kom Al-Hittan on Luxor’s West Bank was fronted by huge statues now known as the Colossi of Memnon.

A colossi statue of Amenhotep III and his wife Queen Tiye, which symbolises their strong bond and eternal power, is an iconic sight at the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir.

The mummy of Queen Tiye, the daughter of Yuya and Tjuya, was also discovered in 1898 in the tomb of Amenhotep II (KV 35) in the Valley of the Kings.

HERITAGE
HERITAGE
Queen Tiye

HERITAGE
HERITAGE
King Amenhotep III

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